Association for Learning Technology Online Newsletter
Issue 2   Monday, October 24, 2005

ISSN 1748-3603

Cover Page
Contents
Feature article
Reflections: ALT-C 2005
Case studies
Electronic Voting Systems
Developing tools for visual communication
Project updates
E-learning and accessibility
The FAIR Enough Project
Conference reviews
E-learning - making it work
Post-secondary e-learning conference in Canada
Software reviews
TalisList: web-based reading lists
ALT news
Director's report
Executive Secretary's Report
Supporting education in India and Thailand
News from members
Blackboard and WebCT to merge
Subscribe / Remove
Privacy policy

ALT Website
Past Issues
Issue 1
August 5, 2005
Supporting education in India and Thailand
How the ALT-C donations help young people
by Rosemary Phillimore

On behalf of the Joe Homan Charity I’d like to say a big ‘thank you’ to the staff and members of ALT for continuing to support the Joe Homan Charity. The cheque for 1,700 donated to the charity this year at the ALT conference will be used to support a Boys Town in Thailand where youngsters have been lifted out of poverty and given the chance of an education. This was something they could once only dream of, something that happened to someone else, never to them.


Patipan Yodkhuntod is studying maths in Thailand.

Through ALT’s generous donation to JHC in 2003 it has happened for Patipan Yodkhuntod, the eldest child in a family of five, whose parents are both general labourers in agriculture in the province of Chaiyapum in Thailand. Patipan is studying mathematics at Khon Kaen University, situated 40 km from the Boy’s Town that supported him as a child. He would like to become a teacher in a high school in Khon Kaen.

ALT’s 2003 donation is also funding G Pitchaimani, who is studying in the second year of a Bachelor of Physiotherapy course at the Cheraan Institute of Health Science in Coimbatore. His tutor reports that Pitchaimani is a very polite, capable and hard working student and he has succeeded in overcoming the language difficulties he experienced in his first year, having studied only in Tamil at school. He participates fully in class discussions and has recently been elected Class Representative. Jeannie Philpott, Chair of Joe Homan, reports that ‘Pichaimani’s ambition is to become a doctor and to work wherever there is a need, be it in India or abroad. He is a credit to the Boys Town Society and the Child Labour Prevention Scheme and we wish him every success’.


G Pitchaimani at his physiotherapy course in Tamil Nadu.

Supporting girls’ education

It’s not just the boys who are benefiting from ALT’s generosity: there are six young ladies who would like to say ‘Nandri’, which means ‘thank you’ in Tamil Nadu, South India. The girls we are supporting are just about to embark on their further education courses to become teachers, nurses, childcare assistants and enter other professions such as computing. The funding for this is coming from ALT’s donation from ALT-C 2004.

Next year I will report on how this year’s donation has been used and perhaps give you a first hand account as I hope to be able to visit one of the Boys (or Girls) Towns as a volunteer worker.

A long term investment

I was moved to support this charity when I heard Joe Homan talking at a meeting in a friend’s house. Whilst ALT's donations are used to fund tertiary education, the mainstay of the charity’s work is matching individual sponsors to a boy or girl in one of their towns. It costs only 70 a year to sponsor a child labour victim and allow him or her the chance to go to school. Sponsors receive regular information and photographs as the child progresses through education. I love hearing about the progress of my girl, who was top of her class of 72 this year. She is highly motivated to become a lawyer because, according to a report I received, her mother was murdered in the hills near their home but the local police could not or would not pursue the murder. She wants to become a lawyer so she can prevent such injustices in the future. Without the support of the JHC, she and her sister would probably be working in child labour.

We may not be able to solve all the world’s problems but it’s a great feeling to be able to help just one family. If you would like to help, visit the JHC web site or contact me for more details.

Once again, thank you, ALT.

Rosemary Phillimore
Senior lecturer in computing
Oxford Brookes University
rphillimore@brookes.ac.uk

Printer Friendly Version
Created with Newsweaver