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Institutional changing paradigms (3 Short Papers 0082, 0160, 0269)


14:50 - 15:50 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room 3bc


82 Plotting the sea-change: a longitudinal survey between 2001 and 2010 of technology-enhanced learning in UK higher education
Tom Browne, Roger Hewitt, Martin Jenkins, Julie Voce, Richard Walker, Hennie Yip


160 SimSafety: sailing in new waters
Denise Carter, Charlie Cordeaux


269 Molenet3 at the Sheffield College – digging deeper, unearthing the network
David Kay, Dave Pickersgill


82 Plotting the sea-change: a longitudinal survey between 2001 and 2010 of technology-enhanced learning in UK higher education
Tom Browne, Roger Hewitt, Martin Jenkins, Julie Voce, Richard Walker, Hennie Yip
Higher education continues to experience growth and change in the implementation of technology-enhanced learning (TEL). The use, management and support of a wide range of related technologies has now been monitored by five surveys, conducted between 2001 and 2010, initially by just UCISA, then for the last 4 surveys in association with the JISC. The survey offers a longitudinal perspective of TEL developments over a 9 year period within UK HE, focusing on the provision already in place within institutions and the current, emerging and planned patterns of use and indeed of tools that are falling out of favour. UK HEIs were invited in January 2010 to complete the TEL survey. It incorporates the core of questions from the previous surveys, in order to sustain, where relevant, a longitudinal analysis. The survey sought institutional responses to questions focusing on strategies and motivations for TEL provision and explored the extent to which this provision was embedded across an institution. It also asked what tools are currently in use both centrally and departmentally. Finally, it invited respondees to look into the near-future and to identify what tools and approaches they anticipate deploying, together with any associated challenges. The survey was then supplemented by in-depth interviews with a limited number of respondees, to ascertain the extent to which the generalised survey conclusions mirrored reality in particular institutions. The paper will present the key findings from the 2010 survey, with key comparisons made with the previous surveys to provide some insights into how the UK HE sector is evolving in its deployment and support of TEL. Results from the earlier surveys can be accessed at: http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/groups/tlig/vle/index_html The data will provide a context to help understand the changing nature of TEL provision and use across the HE sector. This will include, for example, the evolution of the relative deployment of proprietary and open source tools and the changes in central and local support for tools. The management and support challenges that these changes are invoking should be of interest to a very wide audience.


160 SimSafety: sailing in new waters
Denise Carter, Charlie Cordeaux
SimSafety is a completely new and innovative approach to Internet Safety. Developed by a number of European partners, and using an enclosed OpenSim platform, it harnesses a 3D virtual world for teaching and learning. As well as offering a unique vision of the complex nature of internet safety the project has begun to identify a number of socio-psychological, pedagogical and technological challenges in providing such a complex learning environment. For example: presenting knowledge in authentic contexts and settings; presenting learning as a process of social participation; creating situations where students can work on problems before they fully understand them; creating a stable platform. The SimSafety project actively seeks to develop a usable, recognisable design framework model incorporating pedagogic principles, analysis, design, development, quality assurance as well as implementation. The project considers the work of Druin (2002) and Prensky (2008) among others, allowing us to synthesise what we already know about the concepts of mini-games, complex games, edutainment and design into the conceptual framework of the SimSafety platform. This will impact on the more general research and development around educational games of interest to other conference attendees. SimSafety will also provide a framework for ‘transference’ across national borders, and will largely address the problem of ‘static content’ – i.e. subjecting all students to the same pedagogical experience, regardless of economical and cultural differences and their personal abilities and learning requirements. This will impact on research and development around complex learning environments especially for primary and secondary education in various European countries (see Rubens et al 2005). This deeper digital divide/ differentiation perspective is being explored, negotiated and incorporated into the pedagogic design frameworks of the SimSafety project. This short paper highlights and discusses the issues that are emerging from classroom trials with the SimSafety beta version, supporting them with real life experiences and case studies provided by the participants. These participants are drawn from a number of schools across Europe, and include both teachers and their students aged 9. –.11 years.


269 Molenet3 at the Sheffield College – digging deeper, unearthing the network
David Kay, Dave Pickersgill
The Sheffield College reported at ALT-C 2009 on the use of CAMEL methodology (http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/camel) to support staff development in its Molenet2 project. The college has since been privileged to secure a further round of investment. Its Molenet3 project has focused on spreading the net, by reaching more practitioners and subject areas across the college and by introducing mobile learning to Sheffield secondary schools partnering with the college in the 14–19 Diploma in Business Administration & Finance. Our 2009 paper described opportunities afforded by the project to address the technical, financial and safeguarding challenges of developing sustainable student access to the online world.