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Frank McLoughlin - Principal of City and Islington College, Martin Hall - Vice-Chancellor of the University of Salford (2 Invited Speakers 0601, 0602)


14:50 - 15:50 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room MA

Audio recording with PowerPoint of Frank McLoughlin's and Martin Hall's presentations made using Elluminate.

Video of Frank McCloughlin's talk

Video of Martin Hall's talk

601 One college's journey – a view from the bridge Frank McLoughlin
602 When worlds collide – revisiting experiential learning Martin Hall
601 One college's journey – a view from the bridge Frank McLoughlin City and Islington College, where Frank McLoughlin has been principal for many years, has long been committed to the systematic use of ICT. In this session Frank will reflect on the college's overall journey in its use of ICT to support learning, focusing on the impact of the college's web-based services on learners' relationship with the college, and on the changing nature of the college's learners and their use of ICT in learning. Frank, who is also Chair of the 157 Group, a membership organisation representing an influential group of large, successful and regionally influential Further Education colleges in England, will also provide a ‘forward look’ covering how, in the new political and economic climate, publicly funded education can continue to innovate in learning technology.
602 When worlds collide – revisiting experiential learning Martin Hall How can universities incorporate the collision between informal education and social networking, and the formal curriculum and accreditation? What happens when the worlds of formal university education and social networking collide? The imminence of this collision is now widely accepted. But what happens when open, byte-sized bits of knowledge come up against the need for sequence and structure, for curricula that build systematically on prior understanding and insight, and formal accreditation? This is not primarily a technological issue – it is more a question about the nature of knowledge itself. Social networking is transforming the nature of “tacit knowledge”. By revisiting formative concepts of experiential learning, leading-edge experimentation with new technologies can themselves be codified and theorized, and translated into organizational change within the universities.