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Lecture Capture (2 Short Papers 0107, 0216)


17:15 - 17:55 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room B63


107 Refreshing the classroom – using lecture capture to deliver a novel blended-learning strategy in the sciences
Eoin McDonnell, Brendan Curran


216 Lecture capture: rich and strange, or a dark art?
Jane Secker, Stephen Bond, Sonja Grussendorf


107 Refreshing the classroom – using lecture capture to deliver a novel blended-learning strategy in the sciences
Eoin McDonnell, Brendan Curran
An educational environment characterised by high student numbers and limited teaching space presents frustrations for both academic staff and learners. Traditional teaching methods were strained – valuable contact time between academic staff and learners had become less interactive as a natural response to growing class sizes. Opportunities for learners to question and criticize become less frequent and so their skills in these essential areas fail to flourish. To meet these challenges, sweeping changes were made to refresh valuable face-to-face time and to encourage learners to critique and analyze the information presented to them. This project formed part of those changes. We aimed to build on previous work carried out in the BioSciences (Holbrook and Dupont 2008, Gann 2007) and used a lecture capture system to record and distribute the didactic content of sections of the curriculum. This freed up valuable lecture time for academic-led seminars based around the pre-recorded material. Student progress was tracked by formative assessment and students were placed in online working groups where they discussed the videos and assessments. They agreed upon and posted questions to their lecturer to highlight topics to be addressed in the face-to-face workshops. This saw a notable shift in the approach of learners - they themselves argued that "the idea is that we think for ourselves". The impact of this blended approach is being assessed using students' feedback collected through surveys and focus groups, and their academic progress on both the blended and traditional sections of the course. This will allow an analysis of this strategy, and will also identify areas requiring further focus or revision before end-of-year exams. To date 90% of learners find the approach valuable and a high majority state that the method should be used in other modules. The project also raised issues surrounding Intellectual Property Rights, Data Protection, employee protection legislation and issues of consent that are relevant to any educational institution. We will contribute to existing research within higher education (Wells 2009) to build a cohesive and informed approach to these technologies. In this presentation we will share our evaluation of this model for exploiting lecture capture to support and not replace classroom activity, how this project has informed wider institutional practice and how we plan to continue.


216 Lecture capture: rich and strange, or a dark art?
Jane Secker, Stephen Bond, Sonja Grussendorf
This paper will discuss student and staff usage of, and attitudes towards, lecture capture at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Echo360 is a comprehensive lecture capture system which represents the latest and most large-scale approach to recording lectures at LSE. Most classrooms are now equipped for audio and slide capture, and all lecture theatres are equipped for video recording. The background to the choice of Echo360 is published elsewhere (UCISA 2007). Its use by teaching staff is voluntary, nevertheless over 140 courses used the system in 2008 – 2009 and usage has increased this year, giving a large population to study. Existing research indicates that staff attitudes towards this technology are polarised, with some seeing the immediate value to students as a tool for revision and to help those whose first language is not English, while others are more sceptical, citing concerns about intellectual property and academic freedom. There are also common concerns about the impact of lecture capture on attendance at lectures (Davis et al. 2009; Chang 2007). Student attitudes towards the system, however, are very largely positive (Veeramani & Bradley 2008; Von Konsky et al. 2009). To complement this research, we wished to study the use of the system at LSE, in order to better understand local staff and student needs, and to provide improved advice and guidance. The findings will also inform the debate within LSE on the pros and cons of lecture capture and inform future decisions regarding investment in this technology. We have undertaken focus groups and interviews with staff and students, to explore the differing attitudes towards the service, and to identify the modes and motives for its use amongst both groups. The interviewees comprised staff who do not use lecture capture as well as those who do. The paper takes a qualitative approach, to investigate these questions in greater detail and with less ambiguity than would be possible with a simple survey. We will present findings from this research, and ask wider questions on the value of lecture capture in qualitative and quantitative subjects in the social sciences.