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Supporting learning demonstrations (2 Demonstrations 0184, 0218)


10:30 - 11:30 on Thursday, 9 September 2010 in Room 3a


184 Making a splash with technology enhanced learning
Jackie Carter, Louise Egan, Matt Ramirez, Christine Rees, Laura Shaw, Nicola Siminson


218 Pushing the boat out: using multiple hooks to improve student engagement
Dragos Ioan Ciobanu, Paul Arnold


184 Making a splash with technology enhanced learning
Jackie Carter, Louise Egan, Matt Ramirez, Christine Rees, Laura Shaw, Nicola Siminson
Jorum is a JISC-funded national repository for learning and teaching resources, enabling the sharing of free resources which are created and contributed by teaching staff from UK Further and Higher Education Institutions (F&HEIs). Jointly run by the UK National Data Centres, Mimas and EDINA, Jorum enables practitioners to access, contribute and share resources that are suitable for use in any post-16 educational environment. Jorum contributes to increasing productivity whilst mitigating risk – by providing resources which can be used and repurposed. Terry Anderson (2009) comments: “It’s becoming to [look to] me as [if] you are almost a negligent academic if you don’t go out and look for the OERs [Open Educational Resources] before you start developing things”. Whilst Jorum is having a growing impact on the amount of resources available for sharing, a key challenge is discovering the impact of these resources for both teachers and students. Jorum provides two collections: JorumUK offers resources from those creators/ owners who need to restrict the availability of their work to UK F&HEIs; JorumOpen provides access to open educational resources freely available for anyone, anywhere, to use and download. Jorum is adding to the range of online tools and services which are being utilized by practitioners, enhancing the changing design skills and knowledge needed to support learning and teaching with technology. This includes the Jorum Community Bay, which supports knowledge exchange and discussion on all aspects of sharing, re-use and repurposing of learning and teaching resources. This will be an evidence-based demonstration, showcasing real success stories via a series of multimedia snippets, featuring users who will bring to life the ways that they have used Jorum resources.These clips will be supplemented with a presentation of quantitative and qualitative data, highlighting Jorum’s usage and its engagement with individuals, collaborative groups and communities. Participants attending this demonstration will gain: an awareness of the types of resources in Jorum, and how these are being used by practitioners; an understanding of the benefits of Jorum – and the value of sharing resources; an insight into Jorum’s perceived impact on technology enhanced learning.


218 Pushing the boat out: using multiple hooks to improve student engagement
Dragos Ioan Ciobanu, Paul Arnold
Ever wonder what your students are thinking? Constantly trying out new things to encourage your students to make the transition from passive to active learners? This demonstration illustrates how a blended learning approach involving several interactive technologies was applied to a 3rd year undergraduate module in Medical Imaging Science, resulting in increased student engagement and better grades. With the objective of fostering active learning constantly in mind, the module in question was redesigned based on research into learning styles, multiple intelligences, brain-based learning and neuroscience. Learning technologies were then carefully selected to support the learning outcomes and a balanced blend of online and face-to-face engaging activities was implemented. Our approach was informed by the latest studies in using Participant Response Systems (PRS) and mobile technologies over GPRS networks and WiFi, and the final implementation took account of practical issues such as appropriateness, availability and user-friendliness of technology. We integrated a PRS in the face-to-face sessions, a technology which follows principles of game-based learning, has been proven to increase student engagement and addresses four of the seven principles of good practice in undergraduate education (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). Moreover, the PRS was seamlessly blended alongside remote tablets which support collaborative and active learning. The PRS was also used to inform the structure of the online component of the module, represented by blogs and interactive online Articulate presentations. The new module design provided opportunities for all students to experience, reflect, conceptualise and experiment in an interactive and collaborative environment. In our demonstration we will have a boatful of tips and tricks related to the design of the module, as well as its evaluation through both end-of-module questionnaires and focus groups. This technology hooked students from the beginning, inspiring competition and enthusiasm. Moreover, given that this module involves several tutors, we will also discuss how a focus group revealed a change of attitude towards using technology to enhance learning and teaching. In addition, we will also outline our research into porting some of the good practice which our initial implementation highlighted to an interactive online classroom environment.