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Making Open Educational Resources happen (Three Short Papers 0090, 0211, 0111)


11:40 - 12:40 on Tuesday, 6 September 2011 in 8.62
0090 Developing Open Educational Resources for Interprofessional Education Ming Nie, Alejandro Armellini, Rob Howe, Jacqui Williams
0211 Supporting Openness and Sharing in an Institutional Context Tim Linsey
0111 Designing for learning with open educational resources Alejandro Armellini
0090 Developing Open Educational Resources for Interprofessional Education Ming Nie, Alejandro Armellini, Rob Howe, Jacqui Williams

This paper reports on the development and use of Open Educational Resources (OERs) for Interprofessional Education (IPE) in Health and Social Care. IPE occurs when students learn about each other’s professional practice to enable more effective collaboration and improve health outcomes (Barr, 2002).

The Medical School at the University of Leicester has been working with De Montfort University and the University of Northampton to develop materials for IPE for over 10 years. These materials have been robustly evaluated and contain face-to-face classroom resources, models of different types of practice learning in communities and in hospitals, and simulated events (Anderson and Thorpe, 2010; 2008; Anderson et al., 2009).

The UKOER programme has generated an opportunity to convert these materials into OERs. This innovation is conducted as part of a JISC and HEA funded project called TIGER (Transforming Interprofessional Groups through Educational Resources, www.northampton.ac.uk/tiger).

In the presentation, we will demonstrate the type of materials that have been converted and released as OERs, which will go live in the summer 2011. We will showcase examples of how academics at the three institutions have or are planning to incorporate these OERs into their teaching practice. We evaluate the experiences, views and perceptions of developing and using OERs on the academics, learners and practitioners using mixed-methods including an online questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Qualitative data is currently being analysed using thematic analysis (Boyatzis, 1998; Joffe and Yardley, 2004). Key lessons learnt from the process will be shared.

We have so far identified significant pedagogical design challenges in converting materials into OERs. For example, facilitation for effective student interactions is essential in an IPE course. Designing OERs with sufficient clarity for facilitators requires highly detailed pedagogical ‘wrap-around’ information to be included in each OER. There are also challenges in design for repurposing and converting contextualised resources into generic content. Copyright and licensing problems, particularly associated with video content, have also been highly challenging. We discuss how the TIGER team has addressed these.

0211 Supporting Openness and Sharing in an Institutional Context Tim Linsey

The development and implementation of Open Educational Resources (OER) has continued to grow nationally and internationally, stimulated in part by strategic national initiatives such as in the US (US Department of Labor, 2011) and UK (HEFCE, 2009). This has been matched by the debate over many aspects of OER including ethical issues, purpose and technology (e.g. Cormier, 2009; Browne, 2010). This paper will focus on an investigation of the processes and support needed to enhance sharing and openness in learning resources within an institution, and through this provide a foundation for potential engagement with OER. In particular the focus will be on the role of standards (see Gonzalez-Barbone and Anido-Rifon, 2010) and technologies for addressing issues of openness across a spectrum ranging from oft referred to resource ‘silos’ through to public facing resources and OER. A number of these issues had surfaced in an institutional learning technologies review. The paper will report on trials with IMS Common Cartridge and SCORM across two VLEs including the use, editing and remixing of open resources through the VLE and with a range of authoring environments. The paper will also consider the role of institutional metadata schema, content systems and federated search.

0111 Designing for learning with open educational resources Alejandro Armellini

Carpe Diem is a well-researched and well-rehearsed workshop for academic course teams to design learner-centred online courses together (www.le.ac.uk/carpediem). Based on earlier work by Professor Gilly Salmon, Carpe Diem has been developed, delivered and evaluated by the Beyond Distance Research Alliance at the University of Leicester over the past 5 years. More than 50 Carpe Diem workshops have been delivered at 16 institutions in the UK and worldwide. The impact and benefits of the approach have been well documented in the literature (Salmon et al, 2008; Armellini and Jones, 2008; Armellini et al, 2009; Armellini and Aiyegbayo, 2010). Carpe Diem shares some features with other interventions, such as Oxford Brookes’ ‘Course Design Intensives’ (Dempster, 2008).

The increasingly high profile of open educational resources (OERs) across the sector and the University of Leicester’s participation in three OER projects since 2009 (OTTER, OSTRICH and TIGER) have influenced the design and delivery of Carpe Diem workshops at Leicester and beyond. In particular, the ‘storyboards’ of modules and programmes have seen the incorporation of OERs from multiple sources and in different formats. A resource audit, conducted early on in the design process, helps identify the materials needed for the course and where they can be obtained from as OERs. Course teams’ awareness of the availability of OERs has been raised enormously as a result of this change.

Drawing on experiences at Leicester and at other universities in the UK and globally, we show how ‘designing for openness’ informs and enhances Carpe Diem workshops today. By the end of the session, participants will be familiar with this approach to learning design and the pedagogically sound inclusion of OERs in the curriculum. Examples of designs with open resources will be shared and discussed. We will invite reflections on how openness is likely to inform, and perhaps shape, the curricula of the future.